Sliding Door Track Systems and FAQ

Track and Truck System

Lower Track
Upper Track
Inline Train
Offset Train
Trucks
Hardware Kits
Cabin Door Latches
Fin Seal

Track and Truck System FAQ

As a quick reference, model year 1996 and older boats will utilize the old style tracks, while model years 2000 and newer utilize the new style track. Model years 1997-1999 were transition years where both style tracks were in production. If you boat falls within this range you will have to compare your lower track to the below pictures to determine which track you have. Notice that the end profile of the new track has one leg that is taller while on the old track, both legs are the same height. Additionally, the new track has slightly thicker side walls & a larger track recesses to accommodate the new trucks.

Marine Track Style Comparison

No, they were phased completely out of production by the early 2000's.


Unfortunately they are not compatible. The new truck has thicker wheels that cannot ride in the recesses of the older track. If the trucks have to be replaced you will have to replace the track as well.


Yes. If you need to replace the track but your old style trucks are still acceptable, the old trucks are compatible with the new track. With that said, the old trucks were redesigned because of the high rate of product failure. While you already have the door pulled out, we highly recommend replacing the trucks at the same time to avoid future repairs.


You will need 2 upper and 2 lower trucks per door panel you are replacing. Most people will need (2) A trucks & (2) B trucks to replace a single sliding door. With that said, occasionally builders have used different trucks in different positions to achieve a better fit to their fiberglass tooling. The recommended way to ensure you get exactly what you need is to measure your current trucks & order exactly what you need.

Marine Truck Types

It is relatively rate, but in the past we have customized the trucks to accommodate unique fits. If you have a truck that is not a standard size, we recommend purchasing the next size up truck and sanding the truck down to match your height.


No. Many of the older model doors were hand drilled and therefore there is no way for us to guarantee the holes will match exactly.


Place a piece of masking tape along the bottom of the original track. Poke holes through the tape to mark hole locations. Remove the tape, place on the new track and drill.  *Note the forward and aft sides to ensure the hole pattern is not accidentally flipped. On the new track, the aft side is the taller leg while the forward side has the beveled bottom edge.


No, standard Phillips head screw drivers and either a corded or cordless drill is sufficient. The tracks can be cut down with a hacksaw, miter box saw, jig, chop, or band saw.


No, it is important that the bottom track be installed with the raised leg facing aft per the image below.


To replace the bottom trucks, you will first need to remove the bottom of the door from the train. This can be done by removing the 3 bolts that run through the train. You then will be able to lift the door out of the train. At this point you should see 2 bolts running through the bottom of the train into the trucks. Remove these bolts to free the trucks from the train. You now will be able to slide the trucks out of the end of the track. Slide the new trucks into the track and reinstall to the trains. You can then set the door back into the train and reinstall the bolts.


No. To Place the top trucks, remove the 2 screws per truck that run through the door into the trucks per the drawing. If the top surface of your door is not covered this is simple to accomplish with a standard Phillips head screw driver. Simply remove the bolts, slide the trucks out of the end of the track, replace, and rebolt the door to the trucks.


This unfortunately gets a little more complicated. If the gap between the cover and the water control surface is sufficient to reach your hand in, you might still be able to replace the trucks per the above directions. Some companies also have access panels on that may be located on the top of the dash/cover, on the face of the dash, or possibly even the inside of the cabin. There are some models that require removing the dash panel completely to access the upper tracks. This often will require extensive screw removal & silicone cutting and is likely a job best left for a professional.


If you are using existing holes, start at the closing end of the track and run all of your screws in but do not tighten down. Then go screw by screw, place your index finger in the gap of the track and tighten down the screw until the gap just starts to close and tighten on your finger then stop. This method helps ensure you do not over tighten your screws and bow the track closed.


No you don't. You should however do you best to maintain the same spacing between the new holes. If you are going to drill new holes, make sure to fill the old holes with silicone to prevent water intrusion prior to mounting the tracks. Always remember that it is critical that the top and bottom track be parallel for the door to slide properly.

Roller Ball System

Track
Carrier
Roller Ball
End Cap
Glide Block
Cabin Door Latches
Fin Seal

Roller Ball System FAQ


The roller ball system is comprised of multiple different parts and some systems vary by OEM manufacturer, the following information is the typical setup we see being used to date. The lower assembly consists of a track, carrier, two delrin roller balls, and two end caps. The upper assembly consists of track and two glide blocks. The track for the upper and lower are the same.


There are 4 different type of glide blocks offered: standard, narrow, wide, and tall. The best way to determine which one would work best is to measure the current block and match it up with the corresponding block. Standard is going to be the most popular option and is in the typical setup of this track.


Using more than 2 delrin roller balls or glide blocks will not cause the door to slide better. Instead it will typically cause the door to pivot in the middle which make the door lean and can mess up the smooth sliding of the door.


The track system will have different mounting locations based on boat model and manufacturer. The track we provide will not be predrilled to match the boat but you can match them up. Start by placing a piece of masking tape along the bottom of the original track. Poke holes through the tape to mark hole locations. Remove the tape, place on the new track and drill.  *Note the forward and aft sides to ensure the hole pattern is not accidentally flipped. On the new track, the aft side is the taller leg while the forward side has the beveled bottom edge. To mount, if you are using existing holes, start at the closing end of the track and run all of your screws in but do not tighten down. Then go screw by screw, place your index finger in the gap of the track and tighten down the screw until the gap just starts to close and tighten on your finger then stop. This method helps ensure you do not over tighten your screws and bow the track closed.


The carrier does not come with the track and needs to be purchased separately. Please see the photo of the carrier to get to this product page.


Track and carrier lengths vary by manufacturer and will require you to measure the original track for ordering. Typically the track is double the length of the door width and the carrier is either the same size or slightly shorter than the door width.


We currently offer a limited amount of kits, specifically Sea Rays. Feel free to give us a call to work with one of our representative to place your order. They can walk you through all the parts needed based off dimensions you provide of the track.


This sliding door system works best for load bearing cabin entry doors.


No, standard Phillips head screw drivers and either a corded or cordless drill is sufficient. The tracks can be cut down with a hacksaw, miter box saw, jig, chop, or band saw.

Sliding Door System Differences

Each system has a advantages and disadvantages that make it unique. Both systems allow the entry door to slide and would be a great replacement for any project. Below is some information on why one may be best over the other in certain scenarios.

Track and Truck System

The track and truck system has two main components going of it. First is that the track and truck system is the most popular system. This system is used by a wide variety of manufacturers and is easier to find. Also a lot of installers have dealt with these parts before making it easier to find someone to help with install. The second thing the track and truck system has is that it is the smoothest system compared to the roller ball. It has stainless steel bearings in the wheels that give it a nice and smooth slide. The downside to this track system is the durability. The parts are made out of high density plastic and over many years can show signs of wear. The trucks are going to be the most common thing to break since the weight of door is putting pressure on the wheels. The perk of it being a popular system is that replacement parts are not too hard to find.

Roller Ball System

The roller ball system is a counter to the track and truck system. This system is very durably and is made to be used for load bearing doors and doors thicker than 1/2". The carrier for this system does not have a thickness restriction making it easier to use in some applications. This system is not as common so parts can be harder to find, however the system is deigned for harsh environments so the components do not generally break. The only downside to a heavy duty system like this is that the slide is not as smooth as the other systems. It still has a generally smooth slide to it but this is typically due to the system as well as a larger door being used.

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